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World Central Kitchen will resume feeding operations in Gaza weeks after deadly Israeli strike

The charity said it has nearly 300 trucks with millions of meals ready to enter through the Rafah Crossing. Others will enter from Jordan.
World Central Kitchen
Posted at 7:59 AM, Apr 28, 2024

World Central Kitchen said it plans to restart aid operations in Gaza on Monday after halting its relief efforts when an Israeli airstrike killed seven of its workers on April 1.

The killings interrupted the crucial flow of food into the war-torn strip, where many displaced Gazans are on the brink of starvation. Prior to the airstrike, World Central Kitchen had distributed more than 43 millions in Gaza, the charity said.

However, after the airstrike, many organizations pulled their aid workers from the area and demanded an investigation into the deaths of civilians who were providing aid.

The Israel Defense Forces took responsibility for the attack and said it is investigating how it happened.

President Joe Biden criticized Israel after the tragedy, stating that it demonstrated the country was not doing enough to protect civilians.

Four weeks later, one of the world’s most recognized disaster relief organizations is ready to head back into the danger zone.

Jose Andres, a Spanish chef and founder of World Central Kitchen, unloads humanitarian food packages.

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“The humanitarian situation in Gaza remains dire,” said Erin Gore, World Central Kitchen’s chief executive officer. “We are restarting our operation with the same energy, dignity, and focus on feeding as many people as possible.”

The charity said it has nearly 300 trucks with millions of meals ready to enter through the Rafah Crossing. Others will enter from Jordan.

World Central Kitchen plans to open a third, high-production kitchen in the region. It will be named “Damian’s Kitchen” in memory of Damian Soból, a skilled kitchen builder who was slain in the April 1 attack.

“We have been forced to make a decision: Stop feeding altogether during one of the worst hunger crises ever, ending our operation that accounted for 62% of all International NGO aid. Or keep feeding knowing that aid, aid workers and civilians are being intimidated and killed,” Gore said in a statement. “These are the hardest conversations, and we have considered all perspectives when deliberating. Ultimately, we decided we must keep feeding, continuing our mission of showing up to provide food to people during the toughest of times.”