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Supreme Court rules to preserve DACA

Says administration used faulty procedure to end program
Posted at 7:34 PM, Jun 18, 2020
and last updated 2020-06-19 00:06:54-04

TUCSON, Ariz. - The Supreme Court ruled the Trump Administration was wrong to shut down DACA-Deferred Action for Childroom Arrivals, the program that gives temporary legal status to immigrants illegally brought here as children. But part of the ruling tells DACA recipients they can not completely relax.

Rosa says she was only six when her parents brought her from Mexico 22 years ago. She sees the Supreme Court ruling as good news---with a catch.

“It gave me some peace, but not all the way just because you know we're still kind of uncertain of what's going to happen until we get how can I say, something more permanent.”

Rosa says she still has some fear immigration agents could deport her. She says speaking mostly English, she’d have a hard time functioning if she were deported to Mexico. She says the DACA ruling is especially good news for her daughter.

“She is in treatment for leukemia. So for me, it has really helped me because I can be here with her, you know, going back to my home country. I wouldn't be able to give her the treatment that she needs over there.”

Immigration attorney Mo Goldman says the Supreme Court ruled the Trump Administration has the power to end DACA but it did not use the right procedure. He says the administration could try again.

“I'm concerned that that could occur obviously it would then probably go back into litigation and be under more scrutiny. So, you know, we might end up back where we started again back in the courts most likely we would.”

Goldman says Congress needs to act on immigration reform.

He says for now the ruling is something to celebrate, but he’s still telling his DACA clients to make sure their paperwork is up to date.

Rosa says DACA helped her hold a job and contribute to our society but she knows she needs to watch for what happens next.

“There's still some concerns, some doubts, because you know, this is my home, this is where I grew up. So, you know, I don't know any other place than here.”