Arizona man confirms selling ammo to shooter

LAS VEGAS (AP) - An Arizona man identified in court documents as a "person of interest" after the Las Vegas massacre says he sold ammunition to the gunman Stephen Paddock.
    
Douglas Haig says he met the gunman one time and he had been contacted by investigators earlier in the case.
    
Haig told The Associated Press on Tuesday night: "I am the guy who sold ammunition to Stephen Paddock,"
    
Haig did not release other details before walking into his home in the Phoenix suburb of Mesa.
    
A law enforcement official told The Associated Press in October that Paddock bought 1,000 rounds of tracer ammunition from a private seller he met at a Phoenix gun show. The official spoke anonymously because they weren't authorized to disclose case information.
    
Records show Haig owns Specialized Military Ammunition, LLC. The company's website says it sold tracer and incendiary ammunition but is now "closed indefinitely."
    
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AP writer Jacques Billeaud contributed to this report.
    
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4:45 p.m.
    
A man identified in court documents as a "person of interest" after the Las Vegas massacre says he didn't know the gunman.
    
Douglas Haig told Newsweek he was questioned by agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives after the Oct. 1 shooting. He said he has no ties to Stephen Paddock. Haig spoke to Newsweek days after the mass shooting but the interview wasn't published until Tuesday.
    
Records show Haig owns Specialized Military Ammunition, LLC. The company's website says it sold tracer and incendiary ammunition but is now "closed indefinitely."
    
A law enforcement official told The Associated Press in October Paddock bought 1,000 rounds of tracer ammunition from a private seller he met at a Phoenix gun show. The official spoke anonymously because they weren't authorized to disclose case information.
    
Attempts to reach Haig at his Arizona home and by phone were unsuccessful.
    
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4:30 p.m.
    
The name of a man identified in court documents as a person of interest in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history was publicly revealed because of a court error.
    
Clark County District Court Judge Elissa Cadish said Tuesday that her staff failed to black out the name in nearly 300 pages of documents released to news organizations including The Associated Press and Las Vegas Review-Journal.
    
After the error was recognized, lawyers for the two news organizations were told to return the documents.
    
The AP attorney returned the documents, but the other lawyer had already transmitted the documents and the Review-Journal published Douglas Haig's name online.
    
Cadish later ordered the full document not be published without redactions, but she acknowledged she couldn't order the newspaper to retract the name.
    
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1:55 p.m.
    
Court records show authorities initially identified two "persons of interest" in addition to the lone gunman, Stephen Paddock, in the early hours after the Las Vegas shooting.
    
The name of one of those people is blacked out in court records released Tuesday to The Associated Press. The Las Vegas Review-Journal , citing police documents, identifies that person as Douglas Haig.
    
Haig could not immediately be reached by The Associated Press on Tuesday.
    
The other person of interest identified in the search warrant records is Paddock's girlfriend, Marilou Danley. She was in the Philippines at the time of the attack and is cooperating with investigators.
    
Authorities say she's not likely to face criminal charges. It's not clear if Haig could face charges related to the Oct. 1 shooting. Police did not immediately return calls seeking comment on Tuesday.
    
The records were obtained after media organizations including the AP sued to unseal court records and autopsy reports.
    
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12:45 p.m.
    
Search warrant records show that in the first hours after the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, Las Vegas police and FBI agents identified two people of interest along with the lone gunman, Stephen Paddock.
    
The name of one of those people is blacked out in court records released Tuesday.
    
The other is Paddock's girlfriend, Marilou Danley. She was in the Philippines at the time of the attack and is cooperating with investigators.
    
Authorities say she's not likely to face criminal charges.
    
Authorities have said an unnamed person could face unspecified charges in the Oct. 1 shooting that killed 58 people and injured more than 800 others on the Las Vegas Strip.
    
The records were obtained after media organizations including The Associated Press sued to unseal court records and autopsy reports.
    
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11:20 a.m.
    
Judges in Las Vegas have ordered the release of search warrant records and autopsy reports related to the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, with some information to be redacted.
    
Court officials are redacting the warrant records in preparation for release later Tuesday.
    
Judge Elissa Cadish issued a written order to release documents showing what investigators told judges to obtain the search warrants after the Oct. 1 shooting.
    
The order followed a closed-door hearing Friday with lawyers representing Las Vegas police.
    
Separately, Judge Timothy Williams ruled that the Clark County coroner should release autopsy records of the shooter and the 58 people killed by gunfire, with victims' names blacked out.
    
The coroner has the option of appealing the autopsies ruling to the Nevada Supreme Court.
    
Media organizations including The Associated Press sued to unseal records in a bid to answer ongoing questions about the investigation.
    
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12:05 a.m.
    
A Nevada judge is being asked to release autopsy records that the coroner in Las Vegas says show the 58 victims of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history died of gunshot wounds.
    
Clark County District Court Judge Timothy Williams is due on Tuesday to hear arguments from lawyers for media companies and the Clark County coroner about whether records detailing injuries and causes of death should be made public.
    
Coroner John Fudenberg also found that Stephen Paddock, the man who authorities say carried out the Oct. 1 shooting, killed himself with a gunshot to the mouth.
    
The Associated Press and Las Vegas Review-Journal are seeking the autopsy records to answer questions including whether there were delays getting medical care for any of the victims who died.

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