A killer in prison--A body still missing

10 years since Kay Read disappeared

TUCSON, Ariz - Wednesday marks ten years since a mystery began that still haunts so many in Tucson.

It has been ten years since Kay Read disappeared.  Her killer was found. Her body was not.

Her sister, Mary Seagle says, “If you knew Kay if you had met Kay you were blessed.  If you never met her or didn't know her I'm sorry."

For Mary Seagle Valentines Day holds love---and mystery.
      
It was Valentine's Day ten years ago when her sister Kay Read disappeared from her home.

Kay Read’s brother in law John Seagle says, “I think about it every day.  Since she wasn't my sister, I mean she was my sister but she wasn't.  You get more to where you accept it more.  It's a fact of life she's gone.  We'd love to get her back so we can put her to rest, you know, the right way."
      
The leg braces Kay Read needed to walk were still in her house.  Her van was abandoned and burned. She was never found.
       
A surveillance video caught the blurry image of a man who had her ATM card.
        
For almost seven years family, friends, a community, prayed and passed out flyers hoping to learn what happened.
         
Finally, investigators found enough to convict a neighbor--Luis Vargas and send him to prison for life.  

Mary Seagle says, "To me, it gave me peace that he's not going to do this to anybody else."            
       
Vargas insists he's innocent.  He has never said where to find the remains of Kay Read.
        
That weighs on Mary Seagle and she hopes it weighs on Luis Vargas.

"I think God’s going to work on him enough to where he's gonna tell us and I'm hoping and I told him in court, God’s going to work on him to where he'll finally have peace because he's got to be a tormented soul."        

For now, Mary and John Seagle keep Kay Read's love alive through a blood drive in her name and Mary Seagle know what's she'd say if she could speak to her sister again.

"I love you.  I miss you. I wish you could come home. We still have conversations, mostly from here but she was the kind of person, the kind of sister that I wish everybody had."

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