Rare super blue blood moon appears

TUCSON, Ariz. - Wednesday has brought a treat for sky-watchers. A super blue blood moon eclipse will be visible in North American, Asia, and Australia.

NASA says this super blue moon coincides with a lunar eclipse. A totally eclipsed moon, sometimes called a blood moon, usually looks red, which will make this a rare "red" blue moon. Making it even more special? It's also the third in a series of supermoons.

PHOTO GALLERY: Your super blue blood moon photos.

A blue moon is when two full moons happen in the same month, a supermoon happens when a full moon coincides with the moon's closest approach to Earth in its orbit, and a lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes into Earth's shadow. In this case, the supermoon also happens to be the day of the lunar eclipse.

While lunar eclipses are visible anywhere at night, unlike solar eclipses, some viewers will not be able to see the entire event because it starts near moonrise or moonset.

However, it will be great viewing in Arizona because the event gets better as you move west. For Tucson, partial eclipse will start at 4:48 a.m., total eclipse begins at 5:51 a.m., and maximum eclipse will occur at 6:29 a.m., ending at 7:07 a.m.

For more on the 'Super Blue Blood Moon,' click here.

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